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[ a different approach MAKES ALL THE DIFFERENCE.]
What a joy it is for me to see them happy and successful and getting ready for the world. The Howard School has made all the difference.

Linda DiSantis
Grandparents Club Chair

Join the
Grandparents Club!

Grandparents are a huge part of our Howard School community and we celebrate them and our special friends during our annual Grandparents' and Special Friends' Day.

Becoming a member of the Grandparents Club entitles you to exclusive invitations to Grandparent events and an opportunity to write a personal note to your grandchild which is hand-delivered to his/her classroom.

Let your grandchild know that you value a Howard School education, and you are doing your part to invest in his/her future! On this web page, we will post news and events just for our Grandparent Club members, as well as pictures from previous events.

Questions?
Contact Development Director Melissa Bishop
(404) 377-7436 ext. 229



A Closer Look at Grandparents' and Special Friends' Day

Why do our students drum?

The music rhythm/literacy connection

In your visits to The Howard School, you may have wondered why drumming is often a part of our instructional day. Would you believe that neuroscience research has discovered a connection between rhythm and reading? Neuroscientists theorize that rhythm sensitivity is a pre-cursor skill to oral language acquisition, which in turn sets the stage for reading development. Studies have suggested that rhythmic skill is related to phonological segmentation abilities in children as young as kindergarten age (phonological segmentation is the ability to break up words into their individual sounds, a skill upon which reading is built). Children who received more rhythmic training during kindergarten showed improvement in a wider range of phonological skills at the end of kindergarten than children with less training. Furthermore, rhythmic ability in kindergarten is associated with stronger phonological awareness and basic word identification skills by second grade. Research is ongoing, but there is growing evidence that helping our students to develop their rhythmic skills will potentially enable them to become better readers as well. Most importantly, our kids LOVE to drum!

Here are some links to some research articles if would like to explore the relationship between rhythm and literacy:
http://pom.sagepub.com/content/28/2/218.short

https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC4664655/

http://ase.tufts.edu/crlr/documents/2012RAW-LinksB...


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